Guide

Menstrual Cups for a Low Cervix: A Complete Guide

There are several menstrual cup brands today that have one or more cup models designed specifically for people with a low cervix. For example; the FemmyCycle and Formoonsa both provide at least two models for a low cervix. Other low cervix brands include MeLuna, JuJu, and Merula. Low cervix cups are typically shorter than the average menstrual cup and tend to sit lower in the vaginal canal. Read on to learn more about your cervix and low cervix cups!

Female reproductive system

Cervical height (low, medium or high) plays an important role when choosing a menstrual cup. Familiarizing yourself with your cervix and determining its height will increase your chances of finding your perfect cup.

But first things first.

What is a cervix?

What is a cervix?

Female reproductive system illustration

The cervix is a tiny but very important part of the female anatomy.

It is essentially the connection between the vagina and the uterus.

It looks like a little doughnut of flesh around 3 cm in diameter, which varies in firmness depending on your menstrual cycle, pregnancy, and arousal.

It is often described as feeling a bit like the end of your nose, earlobe or lips.

It is sometimes referred to as the neck of the uterus (cervix uteri in Latin), similar to the neck of a bottle.

It may be possible to feel a small dent in the center.

It has a tiny opening that allows sperm to swim in and menstrual fluid to flow out.

The tip of the cervix can be seen from inside of the vagina during exams and can be reached and felt by a fingertip.

Your multifunctional cervix is also designed to adapt for childbirth, with the ability to expand up to 10 cm during labor.

The cervix is what allows your menstrual flow to travel from your uterus into the vagina, and then into your menstrual cup.

For some people, the cervix moves significantly lower during their period.

Since the cervix is usually relatively high in the vagina and the menstrual cup is placed low in the vagina, the cervix remains above the cup.

If the cervix sits low, it may be positioned inside the cup.

In contrast, tampons generally sit further up inside the vagina, just where the cervix is located.

Where is the cervix?

Female reproductive system from the side

Cervix close up

The cervix is the lower part of the uterus situated between the external os (external orifice) and internal os (internal orifice).

The cervical canal connects the interior of the vagina and the cavity of the body of the uterus.

Cervix extreme close up

In some women, the womb or uterus is tipped backward, pointing toward the lower back.

This is known as a retroverted, tilted, or tipped uterus.

Usually, the uterus sits upright, in a vertical or up-and-down position.

A tilted uterus is quite common, with 20 women out of every 100 having the condition.

The various possible positions of the uterus are as follows:

Retroverted: The uterus is tipped backward so that it aims towards the rectum instead of forward towards the belly.

Retrocessed: The uterus is tilted forward, with the cervical opening pointed toward the back.

Anteflexed: The uterus is tipped towards the bladder and folded over.

Retroflexed: The uterus is tipped backward and folded toward the back.

Uterus positions

Many people with tipped or tilted uteruses find using a menstrual cup easy.

If your uterus/cervix is tipped or tilted, be sure to take some time to find which angle will suit you best when your cup is inserted.

What is a low cervix?

A low cervix

A low cervix is a term used to describe a cervix that is felt low in the vagina.

Does the cervix move?

The cervix is always on the move throughout the menstrual cycle.

Right before your period starts to a couple of days into your period your cervix drops lower.

In the middle to end of your period, the cervix may start to rise back up.

And as you approach ovulation and at the height of ovulation, the cervix moves up to its highest position.

It may move so high that it’s hard to reach or can’t be found.

If your cervix moves drastically, you may want to purchase a two-pack of menstrual cups that offer both a small and a larger size.

This will allow you to use whichever cup is more comfortable and/or easier to reach for you when your cervix is at its different heights.

When should I measure my cervix?

Having a low cervix is often common after multiple births, and can occur naturally as we age.

If you suspect you have a low cervix, but you aren’t sure, it can be helpful to measure your cervix height before purchasing a menstrual cup.

The cervix moves to different positions during your cycle, so it’s best to check the approximate measurement sometime right before your period starts to a couple of days into your period, which is when the cervix normally drops down to its lowest point.

Another tip is checking your cervix height at different stages throughout the month and your period, so you can be sure to pick a menstrual cup that fits you throughout menstruation.

What has the cervix got to do with menstrual cups?

Menstrual cups come in all kinds of shapes and sizes, but what’s important is that it sits below your cervix to collect the flow, while also being fully inside the vagina, including the stem.

Correct and incorrect placement of menstrual cup illustration

If the menstrual cup sits past your cervix, the menstrual flow will go right past it, and you’ll experience leaks.

If your cup is positioned so that the cervix is mostly beside the cup, or the rim is just below the opening of the cervix, it won’t be able to collect menstrual flow and you'll experience leaks - it’ll still collect some menstrual flow, however.

The cervix needs to be completely above the opening of the cup to collect all of your menstrual flow.

Menstrual cup inside the vagina below the cervix

And for some people with a lower cervix, their cervix may dip inside the opening of the cup, but that’s totally fine.

Why should I measure my cervix?

If you know the length of your vaginal canal, ie. the height of your cervix, you’ll have a better chance of finding your perfect menstrual cup match.

Low, Medium or Heigh Cervix: Determining the Height of Your Cervix

Did you know the cervix changes position and texture depending on where you are in your ovulation cycle?

When you’re fertile and ovulating, the cervix will become softer and may feel similar to your earlobe or lips.

It will be much more moist from cervical secretions and a dimple may be felt from the slight opening that allows your menstrual flow to travel from your uterus into the vagina.

Other times, the cervix may feel more firm (like the tip of your nose).

The cervical opening is closed and you might not be able to feel a dimple at all.

You can also picture the cervix like a small donut with a tiny hole in the center.

So make sure to check the approximate measurement sometime right before your period starts to a couple of days into your period.

There's no special equipment needed to determine the height of your cervix.

Let’s get started.

How to measure the height of your cervix

Again, measure your cervix right before your period starts or at the beginning of your period, and then again at the middle or end of your period.

1. Wash your hands with soap and water

Since you'll be using your fingers to feel your cervix, it's important to wash your hands thoroughly to prevent transmitting bacteria to your reproductive system.

If you have long nails, you might consider giving them a trim before feeling your cervix.

A long, sharp nail could scratch your vagina.

2. Get in a comfortable position

A sitting position (rather than standing or lying down) allows for easy access to the cervix with a minimum of discomfort.

Sit on the edge of your bed or bathtub with your knees apart.

3. Insert your longest finger into your vagina

Insert finger into the vagina

Gently move your finger into your vaginal opening and let it glide into your vagina.

Depending on where you are in your ovulation cycle, your finger may reach several inches into your vagina before you feel your cervix.

You may lubricate your finger with a water-based lubricant to help it glide in more easily.

Do not use any product not specifically labeled for use in the vagina.

4. Feel for the cervix

Feeling cervix with fingers

The tip of your finger will touch the donut-shaped opening at the end of your vagina.

Cervix view from below

It’s most likely to be at the top of the front vaginal wall (closer to your belly button than to your back).

You'll know it's your cervix if your finger isn't able to keep reaching further (the cervix may be hard to reach or completely out of reach depending on where you are in your cycle).

If measuring your cervix is difficult, ask your gynecologist at your next exam to assist.

They will be very familiar with menstrual cups and might even have some additional tips and advice that can help.

Measurement (approximate)

Cervix height

Granted these measurements are not the most scientific, but for the purposes of determining the height of your cervix for menstrual cup usage, it will do just fine.

Low cervix (short vaginal canal)

Low cervix illustration

If you could feel the cervix by inserting your finger to the first knuckle closest to the fingertip, you have a low cervix.

Medium cervix (average vaginal canal)

Medium cervix illustration

If you could feel the cervix by inserting your finger to the second/middle knuckle, you have a medium cervix.

High cervix (long vaginal canal)

High cervix illustration

If you could feel the cervix by inserting your entire finger to the third knuckle (the knuckle on your first), needed to push further in to reach it, or can’t feel it at all, you have a high cervix.

Low cervix menstrual cups

When choosing a menstrual cup for a low cervix it’s important that you check the length measurements of the cup.

Both the length of the body of the cup, the length of the stem (can be trimmed), and the total length.

For a low cervix, you will need a shorter cup.

FemmyCycle Petite

FemmyCycle Petite

Menstrual cup Capacity Width/Diameter Length without stem Stem length Total length
FemmyCycle Petite 17.5 ml 31 mm 38 mm 15 mm 57 mm

FemmyCycle Petite is marketed as:

"The FemmyCycle Petite menstrual cup is perfect for teens, smaller-bodied women, and those with lighter menstrual cycles.

With a 10% smaller design than the FemmyCycle Regular, the FemmyCycle Petite still holds up to 17.5 ml and features the same patented no-spill design and flexible removal ring.

It can be used for up to 12 hours, depending on the menstrual flow.

It is safe, cost-effective and minimizes the mess and leakage associated with almost all other menstrual products.

It’s ideal for first-time cup users and can be worn during sleep, exercise, sports, and other daily activities."

FemmyCycle Low Cervix

FemmyCycle Low Cervix

Menstrual cup Capacity Width/Diameter Length without stem Stem length Total length
FemmyCycle Low Cervix 30 ml 36 mm 43 mm 20 mm 63 mm

The FemmyCycle Low Cervix cup is a couple of millimeters wider and taller than FemmyCycle Petite.

Product description:

"The FemmyCycle Low Cervix menstrual cup is specially designed for women with lower than average cervices or shorter vaginal canals.

This means that your cervix is within 2″ of the vaginal opening, but not any lower.

Please see the important sizing information below before purchasing.

Compared to the FemmyCycle Regular, the Low Cervix is shorter and has a smaller removal ring while still holding up to 30 ml of fluid.

If you have had discomfort or issues using traditional cups, a shorter cup may be the answer."

"NOTE: DO NOT use the FemmyCycle Low Cervix if your cervix is less than 2″/51 mm from the vaginal opening or with any degree of prolapse."

FemmyCycle Regular

FemmyCycle Regular

Menstrual cup Capacity Width/Diameter Length without stem Stem length Total length
FemmyCycle Regular 30 ml 36 mm 43 mm 7 mm 50 mm

The FemmyCycle Regular is not advertised as a low cervix cup but it’s still shorter than most menstrual cups.

For example, the Lunette Model 1, which is their smallest model, is 47 mm in length (without the stem), and 72 mm with the stem.

And here’s FemmyCycles sales pitch for FemmyCycle Regular:

"The FemmyCycle is a revolutionary menstrual cup unlike any other cup on the market.

Invented by a doctor, the FemmyCycle menstrual cup features a patented no-spill design for less mess, a flexible removal ring for comfort, and is made from the softest medical grade silicone.

The FemmyCycle Regular is easy to use, making it a great choice for first-time cup users.

It can hold up to 30 ml of fluid.

With up to 12 hours of leak-free protection, the FemmyCycle can be used overnight, during exercise, and throughout your day.

Ready for your best period ever?

Get your FemmyCycle today!"

Formoonsa Training Cup

Formoonsa Training Cup

Menstrual cup Capacity Width/Diameter Length without stem Stem length Total length
Formoonsa Training Cup 10 ml 36 mm 31 mm 24 mm 55 mm

Formoonsa menstrual cups are designed and produced in Taiwan and they are made of medical-grade silicone.

They’ve been around since February of 2017.

The Formoonsa Training Cup is described as "to reduce your fear at first use", "this is for you to be able to practice how to fold, insert and remove the cup before you gain confidence" in using any of the other cups in their product line.

The Formoonsa Training is the smallest of their three low cervix cups.

Formoonsa Standard Cup

Formoonsa Standard Cup

Menstrual cup Capacity Width/Diameter Length without stem Stem length Total length
Formoonsa Standard Cup 20 ml 44 mm 37 mm 17 mm 54 mm

The Formoonsa Standard Cup is a couple of mm longer than the Training Cup.

It’s "recommended for beginners".

"For women 30 years of age or younger, light flow".

Formoonsa Large Cup

Formoonsa Standard Cup

Menstrual cup Capacity Width/Diameter Length without stem Stem length Total length
Formoonsa Large Cup 30 ml 48 mm 44 mm 8 mm 52 mm

Formoonsa Large Cup is the longest of their three low cervix cups.

It is marketed as follows:

"For women 30 years of age and older, heavy flow, given birth."

Other low cervix menstrual cups

There are several other brands that we’re only going to mention briefly since we haven’t added them to our database yet (we will update this post once we’ve collected and analyzed all the data).

JuJu Cup Model 4

MeLuna Cup 

Merula Cup 

Note: These aren't the only low cervix cups on the market - there are more.

Low cervix menstrual cups comparison chart

Menstrual cup Capacity Width/Diameter Length without stem Stem length Total length
FemmyCycle Petite 17.5 ml 31 mm 38 mm 15 mm 57 mm
FemmyCycle Low Cervix 30 ml 36 mm 43 mm 20 mm 63 mm
FemmyCycle Regular 30 ml 36 mm 43 mm 7 mm 50 mm
Formoonsa Training Cup 10 ml 36 mm 31 mm 24 mm 55 mm
Formoonsa Standard Cup 20 ml 44 mm 37 mm 17 mm 54 mm
Formoonsa Large Cup 30 ml 48 mm 44 mm 8 mm 52 mm

Again, new cups and models are introduced to the feminine hygiene market every year.

We try our best to keep the menstrual cup comparison chart in this article up to date but sometimes it can be hard to keep up.

To be absolutely sure you got the latest info check the menstrual cup search database or CUP-FIGURATOR™ and filter by low cervix (this feature is coming soon for the search database - in the meantime use CUP-FIGURATOR™ and select "Low cervix" once you get to that question).

How to find your perfect low cervix menstrual cup

There are over 200 menstrual cup brands in the world.

And searching and comparing menstrual cups manually can be time-consuming.

That’s why we developed CUP-FIGURATOR™ Menstrual Cup Finder.

CUP-FIGURATOR™ not only speeds up the process of finding a menstrual cup but it also provides you with some handy comparison tools that will save you even more time and effort.

And hopefully, some money too by not having to buy multiple incompatible cups before finding the right one.

Seriously, give it a try - go find your perfect low cervix cup!

Sources

https://www.betterhealth.vic.gov.au/health/conditionsandtreatments/retroverted-uterus
https://www.mycup.co.nz/tilted-uterus-and-menstrual-cup-use/
https://www.pixiecup.com/menstrual-cup-with-tilted-uterus/
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cervix
https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/320965.php
https://www.saaltco.com/how-to-saalt/faqs/
https://menstrualcupreviews.net/high-or-low-cervix/
https://venuscup.com/cervix/
https://daisymenstrualcup.com/menstrual-cups-for-low-cervix/
https://rubycup.com/blogs/news/4-things-you-should-know-about-your-cervix-before-using-a-menstrual-cup
https://menstrualcup.co/your-cervix-and-menstrual-cups/
https://www.lunette.com/blogs/news/high-cervix-low-cervix-and-your-menstrual-cup
https://divacup.com/get-to-know-your-cervix/
https://www.wikihow.com/Feel-Your-Cervix
https://femmycycle.com/
https://www.formoonsacup.com/english


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